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1 Jun
2016

Self-Promotion, Writing and Social Media

Social Media and Writers

“I want to write.  The last thing I want to do is market my book!”

My own feelings about marketing were similar when I got serious about writing a novel inspired by my grandparents.  In fact, I frequently had avoided marketing during my former consulting career.  Self-promotion does not come easily for many of us who are consultants or writers.

But, in 2014 I attended the San Francisco Writer’s Conference.  I realized how naïve those words are for a writer who wants to publish in today’s topsy-turvy market.  I also better understood why the second edition of my non-fiction book, published by a trade press, had not been promoted by the publisher as heavily as the first edition.

Writer’s Platform

What I learned at that Conference and in subsequent writing conferences and workshops, is that writers must market and promote their own work if they want to sell their books.  Writers need a “platform” composed of friends, colleagues and contacts who “like” or follow them.  To build that platform, writers must join two or more social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Linked-In, Pinterest, Instagram, Google + or Goodreads.  They must also build a website and send out blogs.

Yes, you are right.  Building a platform takes time.  Frances Caballo, who has specialized and written books about social media for writers, declares that authors need to spend only thirty minutes a day posting on social media.  However, I have found that it takes a much larger time investment to learn the rules and practices of the specific platform, craft my profile and get comfortable in using it.  The effort to reach followers and build a platform must not be too flagrant, too frequent or too frustrating to your “followers”.   But what does that mean?

It means an author/writer should spend about 80 percent of her communication with her “followers” giving interesting tidbits, advice, suggestions, information and links that her readers might like or enjoy.  The other 20 percent of her communication on social media, she can write some tasteful self-promotion of her work.

Thirty Minutes?  Really?

Building a platform takes time from writing her book.  It means spending time writing a blog or finding content to post or link on social media.  It is time figuring out why the photo she wanted to post turned sideways.  It means spending some of those thirty minutes commenting and engaging with her followers.  And, there is no guarantee that engaging in all this social media will actually build a platform of followers interested in her writing.  There is only hope.

Another recommendation from the Writer’s Conference was to begin building the writer’s platform long before the book is due to be released…Two years?  At least one.  And the six months before publication when she is busy doing final edits, choosing a cover design and finalizing a publisher, she must really step up building that platform.

Publishing in Six Months

I am hoping to publish this year, in the next six months.  So, I am stepping up my social media efforts.  And I want to spend some of the twenty percent of my communication with you to boldly ask you to:  Like my Facebook page; sign up on my website to receive updates about my book in your in-box;  share my postings on your own social media; and tell your friends.

Thank you!

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