Menu
Tagged with " diversity"
18 Dec
2018
Posted in: Diversity
By    No Comments

Mayor Wilmot Collins

 

Mayor Wilmot Collins, Helena MT

Mayor Wilmot Collins. (Photo: Christian Science Monitor, Melanie Stetson Freeman/Staff)

This story inspired me and touched my heart especially since it describes the amazing accomplishments of the man who serves as mayor of the capital of Montana, my home state, and a state that holds the distinction of never before having a black mayor since it became a state. Read all about Mayor Collins here: https://bit.ly/2Bu0cjN

Wilmot Collins’s back story includes escaping the civil war in Liberia, only to end up homeless in Ghana without permission to join his new wife in the U.S. After a miracle connection, he began the arduous process of completing the bureaucratic hurdles to come to the United States.

Now almost 25 years later he is not only the mayor of Helena, Montana, his part-time job, but he also serves as a child protection specialist in his “day job”. In addition, he holds leadership positions in the community– coaching soccer, singing in his Methodist church choir, serving on the board of the United Way, joining the National Guard.

Wilmot Collins stands in stark contrast to the voices of hatred who shout their resistance to allowing immigrants into our country as we have for generations. I have written about diversity as a hope for the future and love as a public ethic. Collins’s visibility and accomplishments demonstrate hope in the potential of immigrants who give back to their communities in gratitude by “channeling their fortitude forged by tribulation into education, community work and public service.” As we hear the heated conversation, hateful slurs and unrealistic fears of immigration critics, we can remind ourselves of the love and enthusiasm of Wilmot Collins, “who has overcome a tumultuous past and is trying to make the most of his future in an adopted land.” I appreciate the residents in Montana who volunteer and offer a loving hand to welcome immigrants from African and Middle Eastern countries who have resettled there. Their actions out-shine their critics.

Share
26 Nov
2018
Posted in: Diversity
By    1 Comment

Diversity – Hope for the Future

Diversity, Hope for the Future, blog by Bev Scott

A Possible Future

I recently returned from Hawaii where I saw the possible future. The Hawaiian population has one of the widest cultural blend of race and ethnicities in the world. The old label of the US population as a “melting pot” is truly represented in Hawaii. The white population of Hawaii is drawn from the Protestant Missionaries who had a profound effect on the native Hawaiian culture. American businessmen who established the plantations to grow sugar, pineapple and coffee became the main drivers of immigration. Because disease decimated the native Hawaiian population, plantation owners sought labor from other sources. Chinese, Japanese, Philippine, Koreans, Puerto Rico and Portuguese joined native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders in the diversity of the labor force. One can attribute cultural diversity and pluralism in Hawaii to its rich history of immigration.

Leadership in the island appears to be drawn from multiple segments of the population. Governors of the State of Hawaii have been drawn from Filipino, Japanese, white and Hawaiian backgrounds and include one woman. From all accounts the multi-ethnic population of Hawaii lives peaceably together without violence, hatred or bigotry. Although I am sure it is not perfect, it is a great role model!

Diversity and Decision Making

My colleague, Kim Barnes, pointed out the research by Erik Larsen which reinforces the importance of diversity in better decision-making.

Diversity, Decision-making

According to the research, teams outperform individual decision makers 66% of the time, and decision making improves as team diversity increases. Compared to individual decision makers, all-male teams make better business decisions 58% of the time, while gender diverse teams do so 73% of the time. Teams that also include a wide range of ages and different geographic locations make better business decisions 87% of the time.[1]

Bringing together men and women who have diverse ages and backgrounds makes for the best decision-making.

From the natural world, we learn about biodiversity. Biodiversity boosts productivity where each species, no matter how small, has an important role to play. A larger number of plant species means a greater variety of crops. Greater species diversity ensures natural sustainability for all life forms.

The United States, not just the state of Hawaii, is a country formed by immigrants from many other countries in the world. It is, then, no accident then that the U.S. produces successful innovators and is an economic power house. Like the natural world where a mixture of species contributes to biological vigor, the cultural mixture of our population has contributed to vibrant creativity and innovation.

Diversity, biodiversity

Losing the Benefits of Diversity

Today, many of us worry about losing this vibrant creativity, openness and humanity. We have been horrified by mass shootings fueled by hatred and bigotry; most of us reject the use of racial and ethnic stereotypes. Yet no disease in the United States is more in need of curing than racism. It breeds irrational fears that in turn lead to political divisiveness, violence and economic inequality. We decry the dysfunction, division and inaction we see in the Congress and reject the words, actions and immorality of the President.

We voice our support for compassion, equality, democracy and the right to vote. Yet, it is not just the radical right, the Republicans or the white non-voters who have contributed to this state of affairs. It is also people like me, and perhaps you, the reader, that make it unlikely that we will cure racism, stop bigotry and hatred or heal the divisiveness that has torn our country apart. Instead, we may slide into increasing isolation, anger and racist outbursts.

 

We can continue to live in comfort in an economically homogenous neighborhood, socialize with those who are educated and think like us, attend worship services with those who hold common beliefs and work with colleagues in similar professions. I am happy for the success of Democratic candidates and, the diversity of those candidates. I don’t hate those who have different beliefs or political affiliations. I do hope that a “bluer” political environment might mean some change in the direction of my values. But will a “blue” political result in much change?

Diversity, Hope for the Future

We tend to see “the other” as a stranger, even an opponent and we label them criminal, illegal, immoral or savage. Because we lack exposure or experience, we feel threatened by those we don’t know. Fear unexpressed can lead to rage, attack and violence. We don’t have encouragement to seek out strangers, to find ways to overcome our fear, to include those who threaten us.

We lack diversity in our lives and most of us don’t seek it out. It is easier, more comfortable and less threatening to be with people who are mostly like us, who speak a similar language, who represent similar values. In our homogeneous bubbles, we let our fears influence where we live, where we go and who we meet limiting our experience and exposure to those who are different than we are. That limited exposure and experience feeds fear, ignorance and racism.

Valuing Diversity and Difference

Above, I presented the real-world examples of the benefits diversity supported by the research data on advantages of diverse teams. I believe we need to expand the diversity in our lives before we will be willing to change and address racism and the horrors of violence. We must include those who are different from ourselves, seek out perspectives to help us solve the issues that overwhelm us, explore radical options to break down structural barriers and listen with openness to voices demanding change.Diversity, Hope, Love

I don’t have a list of steps to begin this process. But I think we must begin by talking, listening and as Valerie Kaur, founder of the Revolutionary Love Project, advocates, loving. She promotes love as a public ethic and the wellspring for social change. We must love ourselves, love others and love our opponents. If we are open to exchange ideas, explore options, value and love each other, we can create alternatives that will honor and respect the diversity of life, and move us toward a possible future of opportunity, creativity, innovation, peace, compassion and equality.


[1] Erik Larsen, “New Research: Diversity + Inclusion = Better Decision-making at Work.” Forbes Magazine, September 21, 2017

Share
6 Sep
2018

National Read a Book Day

National Read A Book Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today is “National Read a Book Day.”

Most of us are busy working, looking at our phones, exercising, watching our usual TV programs.  We put off reading until vacation or “when I have time.” Many of us have a stack of books beside our bed but we fall asleep before we read more than a paragraph.

Today, take a book off your stack of “books to read.” Or if you need a good book, go to your local library, visit your neighborhood independent bookstore or go on line at Hometown Reads to choose a book by a local author.

Today is a day to skip exercise, put off watching TV and ignore your phone. Instead, find a comfortable chair, your favorite beverage and open a book in your favorite genre. Take a deep breath and enjoy reading!

Share
28 Mar
2017

Women’s History Month: Sarah and Grandma’s Inspiration  

“Each time a girl opens a book and reads a womanless history, she learns she is worth less.” 

Myra Pollack Sadker*

Women's History Month

Grandma’s Inspiration

My grandmother, Ellen Russell Scott, inspired and motivated me as I was growing up. She was in constant pain from rheumatoid arthritis, yet she seldom complained. She shared a smile with everyone she encountered. As a former teacher, Ellen valued education and encouraged me to get good grades and do the best I could.

I agree with the National Women’s History Project, (NWHP) that “We draw strength and inspiration from those who came before us.” My hope in writing a story based on Ellen’s life, “Sarah’s Secret: A Western Tale of Betrayal and Forgiveness,” was that others would find inspiration in her courage and her strength.

Sarah

The character of Sarah is devastated by the loss of her husband Sam, as I imagined Ellen must have been when my grandfather H.D. Scott died leaving her a widow with five children. Here is an excerpt from the book.

Immediately after his death, she steps outside…

”I felt myself shiver.  The wind was unusually still for New Mexico, but the air was crisp and cold. I went back inside. I wanted to feel the heat from the fire in the stove. I wanted to be warm, really warm.  I sat down in my rocking chair rocking slowly. The coldness inside moved up my back and tingled at the nape of my neck….

“’I’m, a widow.’ I said aloud. I was alone, completely responsible for the children, not just for a few weeks or the winter season until Sam returned. I felt cold, flat. I opened my Bible, hoping for solace. I began to survey the landscape of my mind, much as I had the landscape outside. My mind was a closed book with all the memories of my life with Sam shut away.  ‘I am alone’…”

But Sarah, like many women alone today, pulls herself together, finds the courage and fortitude to take her five children back to Nebraska.

Sarah Finds Strength and Confidence

The back story of Sam, a fictional character, is based only on limited information about my grandfather, a man not as Sarah experienced him nor what the reader expects. Sarah must face the betrayal of her trusted husband. Like many women who face adversity, Sarah finds through the humiliation of betrayal and her struggle to hold her family together, the strength and confidence within herself to take a position as the first woman school superintendent in the state of Nebraska.

Women’s History Overlooked

Without knowing about the women in our history or in our family stories we lose the opportunity to find role models, be inspired and dream about our future. As we know, women in our diverse American cultures are overlooked in mainstream history. Yet, as the NWHP website states, “they are part of our story, and a truly balanced and inclusive history recognizes how important women have always been in American society.”

I am grateful to the National Women’s History Project founded over 30 years ago in Santa Rosa, CA. NWHP serves as a catalyst, a leader and a resource in promoting women and their role in our American history. In 1978, they initiated a week of celebration of “Women’s History.” Congress ultimately declared March as Women’s History Month in 1987. This month is in recognition of the importance of women in our history. A balanced and inclusive history must not make the mistake of ignoring the critical role and contribution of women.

The Power of History and Inspiration

Knowing the stories of women from our own families, acknowledging the contributions of women in our cultural heritage and giving recognition to the historical achievement of the women overlooked in our history books, helps us know who we are. Then we can feel the power of inspiration and ignite our dreams.

What stories do you know about the women in your family history? What women in your life have inspired and motivated you?


*Quoted on the website of the National Women’s History Project.

Share

Who Are Your Family Role Models and Inspiration?

In recognition of International Women’s Day, I honor my grandmothers and my aunts who have inspired me  and served as significant role models.

Schoolhouse, Old West, Plains

 

Years ago, one of my favorite aunts came for a visit when I was in my mid-thirties experiencing a low point in my life. She gave a life-long gift by reminding me of the role models I had in the strong women in my family. It was from them, I could always find inspiration and direction.

Both of my grandmothers had been school teachers. My paternal grandmother, Ellen, also became a school superintendent. Ellen was a great cheerleader and encouraged me to succeed in school, get good grades and go to college. My maternal grandmother, Grace, was disappointed that she had to give up teaching school to become a farmer’s wife. But she continued to read the Atlantic Monthly and other books and periodicals. She wrote letters about what she read and shared her opinions about the news and politics in letters to her daughters.

My aunt pointed out that both Ellen and Grace had significant challenges in their lives: Grace, reluctantly left school teaching which she loved to manage her husband’s family farm which she resented. She worked hard to survive the depression and the dust bowl. Ellen was left a widow when her youngest of five children was a few months old.

Ellen Scott, grandmother,

Ellen Scott, my grandmother, a teacher, and a strong role model.

Ellen, in particular has been an inspiration to me. I am currently writing a fictionalized story of her life. As a widow without a means of support, Ellen applied for widows benefits. The Government Agent who came in April of 1912 to interview her in person, filed a sensitive descriptive report (which I recovered from the National Archives). She was living in a tent south of Thedford, Nebraska where she had filed a land claim. He reports that

“she hopes to establish a home for herself and children; but it looks like a most hazardous undertaking as she is practically an invalid because of rheumatism (sic), and her children are undersized puny looking little fellows, and they are more than a mile from the nearest water….In their present desolate surroundings their condition is pitiable in the extreme.”

This was the occasion when she learned that her husband had a former wife and family. The agent describes,

“until I informed her of the fact, claimant declares she had no knowledge of the existence of a former wife. Her grief and tears were convincing of the truth. She begged me not to tell anyone in her home neighborhood.”

This helps explain why no one in the family knew about a prior family. Ellen shared no information about him with her children. Despite her crippling rheumatoid arthritis, she pulled herself together; returned to teaching school; became a school superintendent; and raised her family. See my blog series, “A Journey to Fiction” on my genealogical journey to learn about my paternal grandparents.

Both Grace and Ellen were also models of strength, resilience and accomplishment for their daughters. All five of my aunts completed college educations at a time when the lack of financial resources and societies’ cultural norms were major deterrents. Yet, they were persistent and resourceful. They found work to pay their way. Between the first wave of feminism and the second, during my young adulthood, all these women had successful careers and raised a family. They worked hard and overcame many obstacles. To me they were pillars of strength and fortitude. They were role models of how to meet challenges and find a satisfying life.

These seven women have been my inspiration and my role models. I honor and pay tribute to them on International Women’s Day.

Who are the women role models in your family? How have they influenced and inspired you? Are there other strong women who have served as role models and inspired you?

Share
Show Buttons
Hide Buttons